The Hope and Hype of Medicine and Technology

by: 
Susan M. Haack, MD, MA, MDiv, FACOG

Infuse your life with action. Don’t wait for it to happen. Make it happen. Make your own future. Make your own hope. Make your own love. And whatever your beliefs, honor your creator, not by passively waiting for grace to come down from upon high, but by doing what you can to make grace happen — yourself, right now, right down here on Earth.[1]

Death and the Church

by: 
Robert C. Kurka, DMin

Just as people are destined to die once, and after that to face judgment… Hebrews 9:27 (NIV)

In his recent ETS presidential address, Talbot’s bioethics professor Scott Rae made the following observation:

A final area in which I would suggest our churches are undereducated is the end of life. . . . Though we preach regularly about resurrection and eternity, I rarely hear any application of those biblical principles on death, dying, and eternity applied to how we should approach the end of life as patients and family members.[1]

Future Resurrection and the Right to Die: Using Strong Theology in Response to Shifting Societal Values

by: 
Joel Pacyna

Efforts to legalize physician aid-in-dying (PAD) are slowly gaining traction in state legislatures.[1] This traction is due, in large part, to the increasingly broad appeal of mantras like “compassion and choices” and the “right to die.” This rhetoric is frustrating, to say the least. “Compassion” and “rights” are meaningful Christian virtues that have been misused by proponents of PAD to legitimize something the church has historically rejected as immoral.[2]

Taking and Keeping vs. Receiving and Giving: A Kingdom Framework for Evaluating Contemporary Issues in Medicine, Technology, and Life

by: 
Susan M. Haack, MD, MA, MDiv, FACOG

In 2013, Google announced the launch of a new company, Calico, “whose mission is to harness advanced technologies to increase our understanding of the biology that controls lifespan . . .

Announcing CBHD's 2017 Conference: Genetic & Reproductive Technologies

Mark your calendars! The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity's 24th annual conference, Genetic & Reproductive Technologies, is June 22-24, 2017 on the campus of Trinity International University in Deerfield, Illinois.

Making End-of-Life Ethical Choices at Bridges Community Church

How should Christians make end-of-life ethical choices? CBHD's Executive Director, Paige Cunningham, was featured by video during the Sunday morning worship service at Bridges Community Church on October 16, 2016 as part of a sermon series called “Cut through the Noise: Discussing Some Topics You Are Taught to Avoid”.   

Watch the Video:

Frozen Embryos: Forgotten Humans

by: 
Scott Stiegemeyer, MDiv, MA

It is natural and God-pleasing for husbands and wives to desire to have children. But we cannot pursue having children simply by any means. Even good desires can become idolatrous if we desire them for the wrong reasons or pursue them in the wrong ways. In vitro fertilization (IVF), for example, is a procedure that presents ethical challenges because it ordinarily produces more embryos than is safe for a woman to bear. The unused embryos are then often cryogenically preserved. The estimated number of frozen embryos in the United States in 2013 was approximately 800,000.[1] These people exist and their lives are in grave danger. Not all of them are available for adoption, but hundreds, if not thousands, might be.