Intersections

Dying with Dignity

by: 
Megan Best, BMed (Hons), MAAE

Bills to change the law to allow euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide continue to be presented to parliaments throughout the western world, on a wave of overwhelming public support for “the right to choose and have a dignified death.” While it is unlikely the debate will go away, we can still hope for a more honest one.

Sadly, promotion of assisted death often has its origins in a personal tragedy. Many of those who lobby most strongly for a change in the law have experienced the difficult passing of a loved one. While services such as palliative care and hospice can do much to relieve the distress dying people experience, many still do not have access to it. We must do better.

The Hope and Hype of Medicine and Technology

by: 
Susan M. Haack, MD, MA, MDiv, FACOG

Infuse your life with action. Don’t wait for it to happen. Make it happen. Make your own future. Make your own hope. Make your own love. And whatever your beliefs, honor your creator, not by passively waiting for grace to come down from upon high, but by doing what you can to make grace happen — yourself, right now, right down here on Earth.[1]

Death and the Church

by: 
Robert C. Kurka, DMin

Just as people are destined to die once, and after that to face judgment… Hebrews 9:27 (NIV)

In his recent ETS presidential address, Talbot’s bioethics professor Scott Rae made the following observation:

A final area in which I would suggest our churches are undereducated is the end of life. . . . Though we preach regularly about resurrection and eternity, I rarely hear any application of those biblical principles on death, dying, and eternity applied to how we should approach the end of life as patients and family members.[1]

Future Resurrection and the Right to Die: Using Strong Theology in Response to Shifting Societal Values

by: 
Joel Pacyna, MA, MA (Bioethics)

Efforts to legalize physician aid-in-dying (PAD) are slowly gaining traction in state legislatures.[1] This traction is due, in large part, to the increasingly broad appeal of mantras like “compassion and choices” and the “right to die.” This rhetoric is frustrating, to say the least. “Compassion” and “rights” are meaningful Christian virtues that have been misused by proponents of PAD to legitimize something the church has historically rejected as immoral.[2]

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