The Importance of Theological Grounding

by: 
Bryan A. Just, MA

As one of several youth leaders in my church, we often discuss the needs we are seeing among our students, what questions they have, and how we can best address them. In addition to theological questions, our students have asked us about social issues ranging from how they should approach relationships with LGBTQ+ classmates to how to respond to political and social justice movements. As we try to identify the best ways of addressing their questions, though, we run into two problems.

Becoming a Pastor-Bioethicist

by: 
Wilson Jeremiah, ThM

If you’re a pastor, then you’re most likely an accidental bioethicist.[1] How so? For starters, you’ve probably encountered (or will soon enough) a question from your congregation about one of these difficult topics: abortion, assisted suicide, birth control, withdrawing life support, children and technology, etc.[2] As pastors, of course, we are expected to provide answers, or more precisely, biblical answers, to those sorts of questions. Once we start thinking about what the Bible has to say to these challenging issues of our day, we become accidental pastor-bioethicists—though certainly not all pastor-bioethicists are created equal. Are you ready to give a biblical answer to such besetting bioethical issues? What does it mean to give a biblical answer?

 

Embracing the Art of Dying in the Church Today

by: 
Bryan A. Just, MA

In my previous essay, I wrote about the opportunity presented by COVID-19 for Christians to think deeply about death and the end of life. It is clear that Christians today approach death in ways that are quite different than those who have come before us. While we can celebrate the advances in medical technology that have assisted in postponing death, we should be quite wary of the ways in which these advances have kept us from confronting the reality of our own mortality.

Talking about Death in the Midst of Pandemic

by: 
Bryan A. Just, MA

In a previous article in this forum, I wrote about how COVID-19 could serve as a jumping-off point for raising issues of bioethics in the church, issues that extend far beyond the current pandemic. Two examples I gave were of issues related to vaccines/public health and healthcare disparities. However, there is another topic that is just as easily raised and is perhaps even more pressing for the church today: facing death.

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