Intersections

Preparing for a Good Death Today | Part 3

by: 
Jürgen-Burkhard Klautke, PhD

What of the older considerations regarding the “good death” expounded in the earlier parts of this essay is relevant for a Christian today? In my opinion, it is, first of all, necessary to think about the problems related to dying a “good death” as a Christian in our current secularized society. On the one hand, the media depict death unscrupulously both in the news and also, and that to an even greater extent, in a never-ending stream of (crime) movies entertaining through murder and homicide. Numbness in the face of death is an unsurprising result.

The Good Death during the Reformation and Modernism | Part 2

by: 
Jürgen-Burkhard Klautke, PhD

In the previous essay, we have seen how medieval authors such as Johannes Gerson or Anselm established an Ars Moriendi genre of literature to prepare Christians for euthanasia, a “good death.” In this second part, we will trace the history of the term euthanasia from Luther to the modern period.

The Good Death in Antiquity and the Middle Ages | Part 1

by: 
Jürgen-Burkhard Klautke, PhD

Since the first half of the 17th century, scholars have debated “euthanasia” as a voluntary termination of life with the goal of avoiding useless suffering. However, the term “euthanasia” was not always related to what today would be called “physician-assisted suicide.” In fact, Francis Bacon became the first writer to use it in such a way.[i] The goal of the present three-part essay is to reclaim the forgotten Christian meaning of euthanasia and to apply it to our present time. While the first two parts represent historical surveys of the concept of the “good death,” the last part will provide a discussion of how such ancient wisdom may be applied today.

Ministry to Trauma Victims: Lessons from the Prophet Joel | Part 2

by: 
Marina H. Hofman, PhD

In the first part of this reflection into how Joel responds to trauma, we have seen seemingly innocent people experiencing a national crisis. We have also seen a prophetic encouragement to return to God in the midst of trauma. In this second part, we consider the implications of this biblical model for us today.

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